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Anime Reviews

Winter 2019 impressions

When it came to writing up my top anime of 2018 list, I realised that there wasn’t much from 2018 that I could really recommend. I would even go so far as to say that 2018 was a poor year for anime. However, in comparison, 2019 is already looking good.

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Anime Reviews

A game of faces: The Promised Neverland episode 1

There are some early visual cues that all is not right for the orphans in The Promised Neverland.

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Anime Reviews

Dororo episode 1 is superb

This is what I needed.

Dororo episode 1 is a visual treat, with its Mushishi esque painterly backgrounds and moody period setting.

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Anime Reviews

Anxious and otherworldly: Boogiepop and Others first impressions

My gut feeling is that Boogiepop and Others won’t be a crowd-pleaser.

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Anime Reviews

Seriously?! The end of Banana Fish

Seriously?!

That was my reaction to the ending of Banana Fish.

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Manga Reviews

Existential sci-fi manga! Identity & control in Toward the Terra

What is my place in this world? What am I supposed to be? I ask myself these questions every day.

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Anime Reviews

There’s just no escaping anime, is there? (Autumn 2018 impressions)

It’s Autumn in the UK now. It’s cold and wet outside, the nights are drawing in and there’s the first inkling of frost in the mornings. Don’t fret though, a new anime season is here to keep us alive, so pour yourself a hot drink (unless you’re one of those weird people that doesn’t like hot drinks. I know you’re out there and I’ll never understand you) and settle in for some freshly baked, long overdue anime opinions.

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Anime Reviews

Great romantic fools: The Night Is Short, Walk on Girl

In 2017, Masaaki Yuasa directed The Night Is Short, Walk on Girl, which is a film set in the same fictional universe as his 2010 series The Tatami Galaxy. I really liked The Tatami Galaxy. I remember thinking that it was a more conventional (and therefore more accessible) anime than his other works at the time (Mind Game, Kemonozume and Kaiba) but it was still unmistakably his anime: raw, hyperactive and cathartic. At that same time, I didn’t know anything about its author, a certain Tomihiko Morimi, who I’ve later realised has a signature style all of his own. He wrote The Eccentric Family too.

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Anime Reviews

Girls’ Last Tour

Tall grass and open skies
That’s where we’ll be
Tall grass and open skies
That’s where we’ll be
Tall grass and open skies
That’s where we’ll be
That’s where we’ll meet
(Yvette Young – A map a string a light)

In Girls’ Last Tour, Earth has been ravaged. Life has been all but extinguished. A permanent winter. All that’s left are cities. Concrete jungles powered by technologies long since abandoned. In that world travel two of the last people, Yuuri and Chito, on their trusty old motorcycle. From skyscraper to subway they move, searching for food and supplies amidst the lost civilization, trying to make sense of the symbols and artifacts left behind by their parents and grandparents generation. What to us are graves, factories, transistor radios and songs, are to them a mystery. Strange, magical things.

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Anime Reviews

The unbearable lightness of Tamako Love Story

I had a little crush, recently. He was handsome and urbane, tall and well dressed. We talked late at night over a bottle of whisky. It felt out of control. It felt silly. I let myself be swept away by daydreams. And why not? Is there anything more uncomfortable and enlivening than the feeling of a new love?